Thursday, 27 July 2017

Alternate Best Actor 1954: Anthony Quinn in La Strada

Anthony Quinn did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Zampanò the strongman in La Strada.

La Strada is a great film by Federico Fellini which focuses upon a poor girl's, Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina), travels with a circus performer she's sold to.

Anthony Quinn plays that performer, and typically to western actors in foreign films he is dubbed so we unfortunately are not granted Quinn's booming voice which sadly would've have been especially fitting to this character. Luckily though this is a very physical performance, and Quinn is a very physical actor. In terms of casting Quinn is a perfect fit for the role as the circus strong man, but also everything that Zampanò represents. Fellini evidently described the character as representing the earth and we can see essentially that sort of grit from Quinn in his opening frame. Any high flying ideals are non-existent in Quinn's portrayal from the outset as he takes on Gelsomina Quinn exudes the general disinterest in her setting up quite obviously that Zampanò is only taking her on as necessity rather than any real desire. Quinn's expression hold the right discontent with this woman who seems to be looking for more out of life. Quinn on the other hand paints a man who is very much part of the darker side of life, and though perhaps he is not truly content with this in that he isn't exactly happy, yet he seems to help create this state of mind.

Quinn's work most often provides a striking contrast to the purity of Masina's Gelsomina. Zampanò is anything but that with Quinn accentuating this harshness though not overplaying it. Quinn rather than emphasizing an active sadism towards her portrays Zampanò treating her mostly as some sort of nuisance that he has to put up with. That is not to say that Quinn's approach is not at all cruel, in fact there is a distinct cruelty within just how little regard Quinn expresses in Zampanò's treatment of her. When he hits her with a switch in order to properly play the drums for his act Quinn's whole manner is less of a man mistreating this woman, but rather almost like he's trying to get a dog to learn a trick. We are given a slightly different side to the strong man when he is performing as such, and Quinn's terrific in these scenes in presenting the showman if only a for the few minutes while the act is going on. Those  moments arethe few times he doesn't seem tired with life, although just right after the act he returns to just as he was before. Quinn establishes only the slightest bit of joy in his whole being whenever he's finding in any direct satisfaction, such as with a different woman, or the monetary boon from performing his act

Quinn for much of the film is this force of nature that seems unchanging as hardened earth. Quinn brings that quality to life without becoming too symbolic though as he does create a man in the amoral Zampanò. There is nuance in his work, something that comes solely from Quinn, in the scenes as Zampanò keeps retrieving Gelsomina despite his disregard for her. There are hints of just a bit of remorse in Quinn's eyes, yet he reflects this as only a hint that never overtakes him long enough to become a good man for even a moment. Eventually the two also meet another performer, the fool (Richard Basehart) who purposefully pesters Zampanò for an unknown reason. Now in these interactions Quinn is more direct in presenting Zampanò's viciousness yet even this is shown as instinctual more than anything. As when Zampanò takes things too far Quinn depiction of the attack is that of careless bullying than real hatred. That act leads Zampanò to finally abandon Gelosomina, and though Quinn was the secondary lead for most of the film he becomes the primary lead in the last few scenes. Quinn is excellent in these scenes as he takes just that hint of remorse he brought in the earlier moments with Masina, to naturally reveal a man finally facing his actions. Quinn is honestly heartbreaking in portraying this man essentially writhing in his past actions, so effectively depicting this palatable anguish as the man who no longer can get by simply by not feeling. This is a terrific performance by Anthony Quinn, as even though we don't hear his voice, he makes a considerable impact on the film realizing the simplicity of the man without making this a simplistic performance.

78 comments:

Anonymous said...

What do you think of him as an actor, Louis? I think he's kind of underrated.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I saw Atomic Blonde and holy shit I loved it.

omar said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on Masina and Basehart?

Anonymous said...

Anthony Quinn is clearly the greatest Mexican actor of all time, it is silly that most people think Cantinflas is when he did hardly anything from an acting perspective.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: well that definitely implores me more to check it out.

Anyway Quinn was the king of expressive eyebrow acting. On the other side of the spectrum, Emma Watson and Emilia Clarke.

Luke Higham said...

A terrific film. :)

Has anyone seen the 9/11 trailer with Charlie Sheen and Whoopi Goldberg.

Louis: Could I have your thoughts on that trailer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33eLaNNTUKY

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on 'Battle Of The Heroes' from Revenge Of The Sith.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the joke scene from Chinatown.

Charles Heiston said...

Amazing work by Quinn.

Robert: What did you think of Goodman in Atomic Blonde?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Charles: Good as always, but he's not in it much.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: What do Emma Watson and Emilia Clarke do?

Anonymous said...

Most people seem to regard both of Quinns Oscar wins as a weak decision which is a shame.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

What are your top 10 acting moments by Nicole Kidman and Kate Winslet?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Quinn was a very consistent actor who brought a one of a kind presence to his film. In his greatest role, Zorba the Greek, you couldn't imagine anyone else in the role. Quinn brought that distinct powerful personality to every role. Now often he was very well cast, in that he was cast as strong spirited sort, but Quinn did have a notable range. This was both in terms of finding nuance in a boisterous sort, but he also excelled when cast outside of that type of role like Shoes of the Fisherman or The Ox-Bow Incident.

Omar:

Masina - 5(This performance is just a bit of cinematic magic really. Masina in her Gelsomina plays it almost a silent actor like a Charlie Chaplin, or I'd actually more closely say a Stan Laurel. That purity she brings to the role does feel so honest and makes her such a wonderful presence within a film. She finds that certain wonderment in her work that is so sweet, and when she performs within the film she brings that certain style in her physical that is something oh so very special. This is in contrast to her treatment and Masina though makes this all the more heartbreaking by keeping the nature of the character consistent yet never shows her unaffected by the world. She does not change yet she is deeply affecting by revealing the way she is pained by the cruelty of the world even though she never truly loses that purity.)

Basehart - 4(Unlike Quinn, I'd actually say the vocal performance away from him brought a lot to the character as the impish glee within the character, that converts to a certain optimism is found within that vocal performance. Having said that though Basehart manages to overcome and even adapt to this character, which is notable that you'd never see Basehart in this role with his actual voice. Basehart works with the dubbing though in offering the flamboyancy yet sweetness in his manner, as even at his most mischievous there is something so gentle in his work. He's particularly great in his final scene that is mostly based on Basehart's work as he portrays the Fool finally lose that smile and positive outlook of his in such a disheartening way.)

Luke:

My reaction:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Va5_rn3vG3A

Well it's essentially Duel of the Fates with a few variations, like throwing in the Empire theme briefly, which are nicely implemented, and make for rather effective accentuation points within the song.

Anonymous:

I'd say the trope, of saying something highly inappropriate just as something serious is about to happen, has become overused but this is a great example of it before that time. It is especially effective due to the sheer brilliance of Nicholson's manic delivery, as everyone else already knows what is happening, followed by quite the effective moment of realization in Gittes.

Anonymous:

I believe Calvin was referring to this sort of thing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2L_8CpuBPI

Giuseppe:

Kidman:

1. Judgment - Dogville
2. Asking for help - Dogville
3. Choosing adoption - Lion
4. Wagon - Dogville
5. Seduction - To Die For
6. Saying Goodnight to McBurney - The Beguiled
7. Train Station - The Hours
8. Last meeting with Tom - Dogville
9. First Meeting - Lion
10. Questioning Chuck's background - Dogville

Winslet:

1. Clementine and Joel meet again - Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
2. Being Spurned - Sense and Sensibility
3. Park Meeting - Little Children
4. Mad Ophelia - Hamlet
5. Final memory - Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind
6. How to win an Oscar - Extras
7. End of relationship - Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind
8. Waiting for nothing - Little Children
9. Confronting Steve - Steve Jobs
10. Hanna's remorse - The Reader

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on Jim Beaver and Robert Forster on Breaking Bad. Also have started on Better Call Saul, I'm a bit worried about the amount of fan service but I'll be damned if I didn't enjoy the hell out of seeing good ol' Saul/Jimmy.

Calvin Law said...

Also yes, that's one of Watson's worst attributes as an actress, although I'd say she's never reached as obnoxious a level as Emilia Clarke in Me Before You.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Thoughts on Iain Glen and John Bradley in Game of Thrones.

Calvin Law said...

Does anyone agree Michael McKean could play a serious version of Donald Trump on film?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Calvin: I don't believe any actor can play a serious version of Trump. By all accounts, the man has no personality outside of superficial narcissism. It would be near impossible to find depth or nuance in a man who has none. Much like how Senator Joe McCarthy never got a proper biopic treatment, it might be for the best if he doesn't get one himself.

Robert MacFarlane said...

But gun-to-my-head, Alfred Molina.

Alex Marqués said...

Tilda as Bowie is the only biopic-related thing that could really interest me at the moment.

Michael McCarthy said...

Calvin & Robert: I still say that Marlon Brando would have been perfect if he'd been around the right time.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: I see what you mean, perhaps best to stick to satire portrayals then.

Alex: That's an awesome choice, though I hear Gillian Anderson's a great Ziggy Stardust too. I also really want to see a full length biopic of Salvador Dali with Adrien Brody.

Calvin Law said...

Brando's line delivery would he perfect, however I definitely feel like he'd refuse to play the man outright.

94dfk1 said...

Calvin: Brando would oddly fit right in today's PC culture considering that fact haha.

Robert: Didn't know Joseph McCarthy was similar to Trump in that sense. Then again, all he's really known for is his Communist manhunts so I see what you mean.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on:
The Village Massacre and Hitler's Portrait from Come And See
The Prologue and The Council Of Elrond from Fellowship Of The Ring
'Get Busy Living or Get Busy Dying' and The Escape from The Shawshank Redemption
The Ghetto Liquidation from Schinder's List
Oil Derrick Fire from There Will Be Blood
'Fear' from Gangs Of New York
No, I Am Your Father from The Empire Strikes Back

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And The Oil Man Speech and Daniel Interrogating his Brother from There Will Be Blood.

Apologies, for asking a bit too much at once.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Tour top 10 john travolta acting moments

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are there any actors with villainous faces that you would consider being much better at playing good or morally grey characters. A prime example for me would be Rufus Sewell.

Deiner said...

Louis: La Strada is one of my favorite films and Masina's performance one of my all-time favorites. Can you repost your rankings on these performances?
- Allison Janney in "The Help"
- Analeigh Tipton in "Damsels in Distress"
- Ann-Marie Duff and Helena Bonham Carter in "Suffragette"
- Aubrey Plaza and Brie Larson in "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World"
- Blythe Danner in "Hello I Must Be Going"
- Elizabeth Banks and Jena Malone in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire"
- Keira Knightley in "Never Let Me Go"
- Kristen Stewart in "Still Alice"
- Mark Duplass in "Safety Not Guaranteed"
- Tilda Swinton in "The Zero Theorem"

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the shark death in Jaws 3-D.

Calvin Law said...

Deiner: Duff and Bonham Carter are 2.5's I believe.

Mitchell Murray said...

Following in "Deiner"'s footsteps, if there already up somewhere, Louis, could you repost your thoughts/grades on the following performances?

- Alec Baldwin and Albert Brooks in "Concussion"
- Rachel McAdams in "A Most Wanted Man"
- Evan Rachel Wood in "The Wrestler" and "Thirteen"
- Whatever is currently your favourite performance of Mark Wahlberg and Scarlett Johansson?

Calvin Law said...

So I just watched Five O and while I have a few issues with how the revelations came about from a structural perspective, I could not take my eyes off of Jonathan Banks. He was fantastic, and I'd dare say that's close to topping pretty much every Breaking Bad performance in a single episode besides Cranston in Ozymandias and Crawl Space.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Since you did a top 20 underrated actors list recently, could you do the same for Overrated actors.

Alex Marqués said...

I've started Better Call Saul, and Odenkirk is so good. Can't wait to see more of Banks (I'm three episodes in).

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Forster - (Interesting that taking all the names pre the series itself he and Danny Trejo were probably the most known, but his sudden appearance is not at all distracting. He instead instantly gives weight to that pivotal character who you frankly expected to be played by a name just due to the build up towards him. Forster's performance goes beyond just being that name though and also manages to give a real life to a man of this most unusual profession. Forster defines his performance by a blunt reality but also a professionalism in his approach to his few scenes. When he agrees to stay and plays cards with Walt, he's doing it because he's getting paid but Forster does not make this cruel rather he really delivers it as "hey I'm just here to do my job", and keeps that really he's going above his call duty. It's great work though as he does bring the right touch of sympathy, just a touch, in his interactions with Walter, even if that even has his harsh edges such as his "Would you believe me" moment. As Forster does find a bit of empathy but within such a blunt statement.)

Beaver - (Similar to Foster, but they are no way repetitive of each other. Beaver's work though is also defined by a guy who just at home with what he is doing in his own low key way, and puts no unneeded emotions or intensity within it. He's there to do a job and Beaver emphasizes that so well. What I love about it is that he's never this caricature of a gun supplier, but rather a guy you could believe does this day to day in Beaver's confident, and straight forward approach. Again though he brings the right touches of nuance there within his purposeful confines, such as his way of saying "good luck, I guess" to Walter, as he brings enough respect to a customer, but he's still only there to do a job.)

Tahmeed:

Glen - (Glen by the way has a great voice that always needs to be said, which is great benefit the sheer amount of exposition he has had throughout the series. You really couldn't have asked for a better guy to deliver it. I will say Jorah is a character I rather like, even though he can be tiresome as you can't help but feel that both he needs to let it go since she's just not that into him, and at the same time she's really just not that great. Any who though Glen does actually do quite well in at least giving something to being King of the friendzone, this is both in a moving way, and kind of a sadly hilarious way such his expression when he's asked if Daario was okay. Again though he does excel in any aspect even when somewhat repetitive in the writing and I will say I've always found him to be a saving grace in the Essos story lines. His most effective scenes though are the ones that call back to his past where Glen brings so much power in his portrait of this man filled with regrets and guilt particularly in relation to his betrayal of his father and his house. There Glen shines every time particularly when he hears about his father's death. Also it is notable for him being part of the biggest distance in performance quality in a single scene when Jorah's initially dismissed with Glen being at his very best, and Clarke at her very worst.)

Louis Morgan said...

Bradley - (Bradley is more or less what Sam should be within the story though he's not quite Sean Astin in this regard. In that Bradley begins as this very earnest yet naive presence and his major change is loosening up a little on the latter. They same goes with his awkwardness and timidness, Bradley lets up on them just a tad, but this actually entirely works for the character whose spirit is not suppose to be broken. Bradley works as this constant, as he does achieve his slight change without making it some non-existent either. He earns the transitions that to exist in Sam, while being just good old Sam, which is something he simply achieved from his first smile associated with knowing something. Furthermore though in his more dramatic moments, particularly the battle for Castle Black, Bradley is there every step of the way. This is a performance, that might not be a personal favorite, but really it is as it should be.)

Luke:

Come and See Scenes - (Both are incredibly harrowing and haunting. The Massacre being so quiet is something that makes it so deeply disturbing as the Nazis just so calmly go about committing such a horrific act. Similarly Hitler's portrait is such unforgettable moments given it feels this act of all the rage and sorrow in the character with that expression of an child turned to an old man that will not leave you. The scene though goes beyond in this though as it also shows the unsatisfying nature of the act as all his hate can only go to attacking a symbol of a cause, a symbol he'll never be able to do anything about.)

The Prologue - (Now that is how you start a trilogy. As it not only gives the series a way to open with a bang it is such an astonishing piece of exposition, as it sets up the whole series and universe we're in with such little time.)

Council of Elrond - (Again another achievement in exposition without seeming a forced moment. He so eloquently realizes the new introductions along with a swift establishment of their unique motivations. Furthering that though it is peppered with really truly emotional moments in there particularly Gandalf's reaction to Frodo's choice, and the pledging of weapons.)

"Get Busy" - (Such a beautiful realization of the central theme behind the film that even goes beyond any sort of prison setting. I especially love how the scene establishes the conflicting idea about the scene without it seeming a cheap trick, in that is Andy's talking about suicide or escaping. He's in a way talking about both, in that he might as well be dead to stay, but he's choosing to live to escape. Furthermore though it just so effectively realizes this moment between two friends that feels wholly honest, every second of it.)

Escape - (I mean you can give this scene as simply an essential piece of cinema as it earns it from following Andy through his ordeal, that score that so builds along with his escape, amplified only by Freeman's reflecting delivery. It's all in that embrace of the rain though that feels truly cathartic as it embodies the freedom of life more than even getting beyond the tunnels of sewage he escaped from.)

Louis Morgan said...

Ghetto Liquidation - (Brutal scene that is masterfully told be Spielberg's realization of it as he manages to make the randomness of it all work, as every segment of it big or small has such an impact. Whether it is a final moment between a family, or the horrific random executions you witness. Spielberg carefully avoids his potential indulgences here, as he waits just for the right moment, as he directs the more "sentimental" aspect carefully connected to Schindler's view, after having just presented it all without any overt touches before then.)

I think that's enough for now.

Anonymous:

Travolta:

1. Tony apologizes - Saturday Night Fever
2. Overdose - Pulp Fiction
3. Final Scream - Blow Out
4. After the date rape - Saturday Night Fever
5. Bathroom Speech - Pulp Fiction
6. Sport tryouts - Grease
7. After the dance competition - Saturday Night Fever
8. Explaining his past - Blow Out
9. A raise - Saturday Night Fever
10. Brand new head of lettuce - Look Who's talking

Deiner:

Janney - 3(though a re-watch could change that)
Tipton - 3.5
Duff - 2.5
Carter - 2
Plaza - 3
Larson - 3
Banks - 3
Malone - 3.5
Knightley - 3
Stewart - 3
Duplass - 2.5
Swinton - 3.5

Anonymous:

Ridiculous though I'll admit it's pretty funny, and if you're going full terrible that's not the worst way you can go.

Mitchell:

Laurence Harvey - The Manchurian Candidate
2003 Bonus Lead Results
Alternate Best Actor 1946

Boogie Nights and probably Her.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is Guinness' review being posted tonight.

Calvin Law said...

I'd go lower for Knightley, as someone who likes her in general I thought she was completely overshadowed by Mulligan and Garfield.

Calvin Law said...

Also, Louis: do you think Gus Fring's family was a fictional construct by him?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

We'll see.

Calvin:

Yes, if you listen to what he specifically says in his family speech it purposefully vague, it is more directed towards Walt, though he presents it as through himself. He directed it that way for Walt, because he has kids, but the idea is providing for one's family, which for Gus is his dead "brother" but, just as with Walter, he built up this in his mind that he was doing it for his "family" when in fact he was only doing it for himself.

Anonymous said...

Louis and everyone: Thoughts on the today's Game of Thrones episode? I found Lena Headey specifically amazing.

Anonymous said...

I love the episode by the way. Funny how they are not wasting time at all this season. And really NOT wasting.

Michael McCarthy said...

Diana Rigg stole this one for me.

Charles Heiston said...

Rigg nailed it for me too.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Rigg was A+.

Louis Morgan said...

Loved the episode, I even thought Clarke was on point.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I kind of despise everything with Euron so far. It's lazy plotting and the characterization is essentially Ramsy 2: Bastard in a Basket.

Louis Morgan said...

I'm certainly hoping there's a bit more than meets the eye, as was alluded to in his first scene in the series though that could turn out to be just an outlier.

Mitchell Murray said...

Couldn't find the thoughts on the two Wood performances

Anonymous said...

Louis: More toughts on the episode when you can and your episode MVP.

Louis Morgan said...

Mitchell:

For Thirteen Alternate Supporting 03(Bonus)

Anonymous:

Well to get the quibbles and flaws out of the way first. The Tyrion narration over the battle felt very odd and out of the style Thrones as though it should have ended with "They are the few, the proud, the unsullied". Also I imagine what Isaac Hempstead Wright was doing was a purposeful choice, but that was terrible. von Sydow still had plenty of emotion, so to rid himself of all of it was quite an odd approach since Bran did not need to be blander. Now having said that there was plenty to love. From an actual earned complication in the Snow/Daenerys relationship, as I really liked the tension there utilizing the previous interactions and history so well even with Davos/Tyrion. Cersei's revenge was an amazing scene for Headey as I liked how she called back to her softer side for only a moment before going all the way into her most vengeful self. Also that was the best acting that included with any scene involving a Sand snake heavily. Again I liked Sam and Jorah as a rather low key diversion, as well as Broadbent who they are making nice use of. Sansa coming into her own was also nice, though almost comical with Littlefinger always finding a place to hide in the shade it seems, although I will say the reunion should have had far more impact but was muted severely due to Wright's odd acting. The best was saved for last it seems though with quite the sendoff for a great character, and I'd agree that Rigg was MVP, though Headey a very close second, by making the most out of that scene.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: only just saw your comment about overrated actors. I can most certainly look into that (though overrated is of course much harder to distinguish than underrated).

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Just finished viewing "The Queen's Justice". It was a massive improvement over last week's episode, due to the great acting all around (aside from Hempstead Wright's work, that was atrocious). Rigg and Headey were phenomenal, and Emilia Clarke gave her most assured performance on the show (although that doesn't mean much).

Also, I'm starting to see what you mean about Asbaek. I still like his trolling of Jaime, but I wish that we get to see more nuances from him.

Calvin Law said...

Just watched Tower. Fantastic, could not agree more with your previous thoughts Louis.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I already was skeptical about Asbaek's performance, and it gets worse every week. I wouldn't blame him completely as the writing is definitely not on his side but still he plays into the stereotype he's given without even trying to bring something new or interesting to the character (which really feels lake a lamer version of Ramsay). I would agree that Hempstead Wright was awful, but that wasn't much of a surprise to me as I've always hated his performance on the show.

I absolutely loved the rest of the episode and aside from the two mentioned above I thought the whole cast was terrific. Clarke was effective this week and even Indira Varma delivered in her final scene. Harington, Turner, Van Houten, Hill and Dinklage all excelled with what they had. And yes of course the best were Headey and Rigg, the latter being particularly amazing. Loved her.

Luke Higham said...

R.I.P. Jeanne Moreau

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your thoughts and ratings for the cast of Nashville (1975)

Luke Higham said...

Saw the third episode. It was tremendous. Rigg was utterly brilliant in her single scene and Headey was amazing as well.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Top 5 Lena Headey and Kit Harington acting moments.

Calvin Law said...

Has anyone besides Louis checked out Daredevil? I just tried the premiere, the action is fantastic, Cox is pretty good, but I thought the rest of the acting and dialogue was pretty bad, especially Henson, Woll, and that glasses guy. I was going to try and binge both seasons (and Luke Cage) before The Defenders but I doubt I'll make it through.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could I have your thoughts on those remaining scenes that I asked for previously and The Chopin Ballade in G Minor scene from The Pianist.

Robert MacFarlane said...

RIP Sam Shepard

Calvin Law said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Luke Higham said...

R.I.P. Sam Shepard

Calvin Law said...

RIP Sam Shepard and Jeanne Moreau

RatedRStar said...

RIP Sam Shepard and Jeanne Moreau

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

RIP Sam Shepard and Jeanne Moreau

Michael McCarthy said...

Wow, RIP Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard. I didn't even realize Shepard was as old as he was.

Anonymous said...

R.I.P. Sam Shepard and Jeanne Moreau
Calvin: Daredevil is an okay show, nothing special much like all live-action superhero shows nowadays.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

RIP Jeanne Moreau and Sam Shepard

Charles Heiston said...

RIP Sam Shepard & Jeanne Moreau

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Could Travolta go to a 5 for Saturday Night Fever.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: I think it's unlikely. He's 5 spots off the border and I'm sure Louis has watched it at least twice now.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the "He's not our enemy" scene from Batman v. Superman.

Louis Morgan said...

I'll cover all requested thoughts on the next comment section.































RIP Sam Shepard and Jeanne Moreau.